Development of an vitro / in vivo correlation method to assess the efficiency of oral drug release from medicated feeds in swine - Ontario Pork - Recently Funded Research
Wednesday, December 11, 2019
    

Recently Funded Research

Ontario Pork has a call for research proposals once a year. These projects were approved for funding by the board on recommendation of the research committee. If you have questions or need further information about the research posted here please contact Cristiane Mesquita at cristiane.mesquita@ontariopork.on.ca.


Recently Funded Research

Development of an vitro / in vivo correlation method to assess the efficiency of oral drug release from medicated feeds in swine

Development of an vitro / in vivo correlation method to assess the efficiency of oral drug release from medicated feeds in swine

Project 19-004 - Lead Researcher: Dr. Jerome del Castillo, University of Montreal

Feed is the most common vehicle for dosing drug therapeutics to pigs kept in groups. It is acknowledged that screening of food and drug interactions is required for human oral drugs approval because of possible interference with the process of drug release, the limiting step to drug absorption and therapeutic efficacy. This is achieved through in-vitro drug dissolution testing (IVDT), using standardized instruments and methods that predict in-vivo drug absorption. Additionally, IVDT is used for quality control, e.g. to monitor the impact of changes in a formulation. Feed-grade veterinary drug premixes are also subject to IVDT [3], but surprisingly, effects of feed composition on the rate and extent of drug release are overlooked, except when they contain certain feed additives (e.g. pellet-binding agents). Previous work by this researcher has shown a 40% difference in the extent of drug release in commercially-available chlortetracycline premixes when tested with and without being mixed with feed.  A result that correlated with under-exposure of chlortetracycline in pigs consuming the medicated feed. The goal of this project is to develop testing methods that will identify feed ingredients or manufacturing practices that decreases the release of a medication to the pig. The optimization of medicated feed manufacturing will improve its therapeutic efficacy, hasten the recovery of treated pigs, and decrease the fecal waste of unabsorbed drugs.


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