Efficacy of exogenous alkaline phosphatases to improve growth performances in pigs - Ontario Pork - Completed Research
Sunday, May 26, 2024
    

Completed Research

Ontario Pork has a call for research proposals once a year. These projects were approved for funding by the board on recommendation of the research committee. If you have questions or need further information about the research posted here please contact Jessica Fox at [email protected]


Completed Research

Efficacy of exogenous alkaline phosphatases to improve growth performances in pigs

Project 17-032 - Ming Fan, University of Guelph

Pig gut endogenous alkaline phosphatase functionality is deficient and insufficient, particularly in the weaning stage, to detoxify gut luminal endotoxins and optimize gut microbiome and digestive functions. This research project investigated the efficacy, biological working mechanisms and environmental impacts of dietary supplementation of optimal levels of the exogenous feed alkaline phosphatases as novel microbial gut modifier additives. This project has been successfully conducted at the University of Guelph; all relevant data have been collected and the related intellectual property (IP) disclosure has been carried out in following the IP policies at the University of Guelph. The project principal investigator is closely working with various industrial partners to continue the IP filing for protection, data compiling to submit a multi-stage novel microbial gut modifier additive approval process with the CFIA. In the final phase of their efforts, they will also be committed to submit the research findings in a manuscript to a peer-reviewed scientific journal to publish the data and research information into the public domain. The project PI expects to accomplish these post-research commercialization and extension activities within the next year (the summer and fall of 2024).

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